Manchester Theatre Award Nominations Announced!

clip_image0022

Nearly 90 performers or productions have been chosen in more than 20 categories for the Manchester Theatre Awards, picked by a panel of 10 regional theatre critics.

The winners will be announced live on stage at a red carpet event at Manchester’s HOME venue on Friday March 17, hosted by comedian, actor – and playwright – Justin Moorhouse.

After watching more than 200 theatre performances throughout 2016 the MTA Panel has narrowed down a shortlist that honours everyone from established star names in main house productions, to complete newcomers.

In the past Manchester Theatre Awards have often gone to actors and actresses who go on to become household or even Hollywood names such as Andrew Garfield, so who knows what the future will hold for those who have been given the nod this year.

Leading the way this year is the Royal Exchange picking up a massive 20 nominations – a double celebration in what is their 40th anniversary year of bringing acclaimed productions to Manchester. This year’s categories for Best Actress and Best Production also see the Royal Exchange and the city’s shiny new HOME venue go head to head for the coveted trophies.

Great news for Manchester’s emergent Hope Mill Theatre making its mark on the award this year with a nomination in the Best Musical category for its regional premiere production of Parade. This brand new fringe venue, in an old mill in Ancoats, has staged several ambitious productions in 2016 and there is a wealth of exciting projects ahead for them in 2017.

One nominee Opening Night would love to see pick up a gong on the 17th March would be Lisa Maxwell who is nominated for Best Actress in a Visiting Production for her portrayal of Judy Garland in End of the Rainbow at the Opera House. Maxwell was mesmerizing at the Hollywood musical star in her later tragic years and it would be great to see her get the acclaim she deserves for the role.

All nominees are invited to the awards event and if you are a fan of the theatre and want to go along on the day you can get a ticket via the HOME website www.homemcr.org or by calling 0161 200 1500. Tickets are priced at £15.

See you there!

Manchester Theatre Award nominations in full…

Best Actor

Rob Edwards, To Kill A Mockingbird, Octagon Theatre, Bolton

David Neilson, Endgame, HOME, Manchester

Daniel Rigby, Breaking The Code, Royal Exchange, Manchester

Don Warrington, King Lear, Royal Exchange

 

Best Actress

Niamh Cusack, Ghosts, HOME

Kaisa Hammarlund, Sweet Charity, Royal Exchange

Julie Hesmondhalgh, Wit, Royal Exchange

Kathryn Hunter, The Emperor, HOME

 

Best Production

Breaking The Code, Royal Exchange

Ghosts, HOME

The Emperor, HOME

Wit, Royal Exchange

 

Best Supporting Actor

Daniel Crossley, Sweet Charity, Royal Exchange

Raad Rawi, Breaking The Code, Royal Exchange

Marc Small, To Kill A Mockingbird, Octagon Theatre

Miltos Yerolemou, King Lear, Royal Exchange

 

Best Supporting Actress

Natalie Dew, Breaking The Code, Royal Exchange

Sharon Duncan-Brewster, A Streetcar Named Desire, Royal Exchange

Natalie Grady, Martha Josie and the Chinese Elvis, Octagon Theatre

Amy Nuttall, The Winter’s Tale, Octagon Theatre

 

Best Visiting Production

946 – The Amazing Story of Adolphus Tipps, HOME

A Girl is a Half-Formed Thing, Lowry, Salford

Love’s Labour’s Lost / Much Ado About Nothing, Opera House

The Encounter, HOME

The James Plays, Lowry

 

Best Actor in a Visiting Production

Edward Bennett, Love’s Labour’s Lost / Much Ado About Nothing, Opera House

Rufus Hound, The Wind in the Willows, The Lowry

Simon McBurney, The Encounter, HOME

Michael Pennington, King Lear, Opera House

 

Best Actress in a Visiting Production

Lisa Dillon, Love’s Labour’s Lost / Much Ado About Nothing, Opera House

Aoife Duffin, A Girl Is A Half-Formed Thing, Lowry

Lisa Maxwell, End Of The Rainbow, Opera House

Zizi Strallen, Mary Poppins, Palace

 

Best Newcomer

Daisy Badger, Look Back In Anger, Octagon Theatre

Ben Hunter, The Girls, Lowry

Norah Lopez Holden, Ghosts, HOME

Kirsty Rider, Pride And Prejudice, Lowry

Holly Willock, The Wind In The Willows, Lowry

Young “Michael” cast, Billy Elliot, Palace

Young “Scout” cast, To Kill A Mockingbird, Octagon Theatre

 

Best Opera

Andrea Chénier, Opera North, Lowry

Billy Budd, Opera North, Lowry

Don Giovanni, ETO, Buxton Opera House

Tamerlano, Buxton Festival, Buxton Opera House

 

The Robert Robson Award for Best Dance

Akram Khan’s Giselle, Palace

Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater, Lowry

Nederlands Dans Theater 2, Lowry

The Red Shoes, Lowry

 

Best Musical

Billy Elliot, Palace

Parade, Hope Mill Theatre

Singin’ in the Rain, Octagon Theatre

Sweet Charity, Royal Exchange

The Wind in the Willows, Lowry

 

Best Fringe Production

 Boomtown Gals, Various venues

Die Diana, Bandit, Mugger and Thief, Manchester

Multi Story, Monkeywood, Various venues

The Trial, Hope Mill Theatre, Manchester

 

Best Fringe Performance

Joyce Branagh, Boomtown Gals, Various venues

Sam Grogan, Waiting Room, King’s Arms, Salford

William J Holstead, The Trial, Hope Mill Theatre

Leanne Martin, The Brink, King’s Arms

 

Best Studio Production

 Dirty Pakistani Lingerie, Lowry

Lemons Lemons Lemons Lemons Lemons, HOME

The Solid Life Of Sugar Water, Royal Exchange

Wish List, Royal Exchange

 

Best Actor in a Studio Production

 Alexander Gatehouse, Ventoux, Lowry

Joseph Quinn, Wish List, Royal Exchange Studio

Rex Ryan, Pilgrim, Lowry

 

Best Actress in a Studio Production

 Erin Doherty, Wish List, Royal Exchange Studio

Sarah Emmott, Declaration, Lowry

Georgia Henshaw, Bird, Royal Exchange Studio

Molly Vevers, Ross and Rachel, Lowry

 

Best New Play

A Pacifist’s Guide to the War on Cancer, HOME

Bird, Royal Exchange Studio

The Emperor, HOME

Wish List, Royal Exchange Studio

 

Best Design

Endgame, HOME

La Vie Parisienne, Royal Northern College of Music, Manchester

Singin’ In The Rain, Octagon Theatre

The Pitmen Painters, Coliseum, Oldham

 

Best Ensemble

946 – The Amazing Story of Adolphus Tipps, HOME

Singin’ In The Rain, Octagon Theatre

The Pitmen Painters, Coliseum

The James Plays, Lowry

 

Best Special Entertainment

An Anatomie In Four Quarters, Lowry

Cirque du Soleil – Amaluna, Trafford Centre

Summer, Autumn, Winter, Spring, Old Granada Studios

The Peony Pavillion, Lowry

 

Youth Panel Award

NOTHING – The Royal Exchange Theatre Young Company

The Secret Garden – Octagon Youth Theatre

The Factory – The Royal Exchange Theatre Young Company

The Siege of Christmas – Contact Youth Company with Swung Low

 

 

 

 

Billy Elliot – The Musical

'

Billy is from a place where the men don’t dance, end of story, but, with a gritty determination, and an undeniable charm plus more talent than most of us have in our little fingers, he sets out to prove his doubters wrong by breaking the mould and going all the way.

Billy Elliot the Musical is a total phenomenon which has been seen by almost 11 million people across five continents and has won over 80 awards internationally, including an almighty 10 Tony Awards and a hugely impressive 5 Olivier Awards. Based on Lee Hall’s 2000 film, set in a northern mining town against the background of the 1984/’85 miners’ strike, the story revolves around Billy, who trades his boxing gloves for ballet shoes and soon discovers a passion for dance that ultimately changes not just his but the lives of his family and community forever.

So ingrained was life in the pits that son’s followed in their father’s footsteps, proud to do so and loyal to their communities. The impact of Maggie Thatcher and her Conservative Government on these communities is something that will never be forgotten and for most certainly not forgiven. Billy Elliot tells the story of a boy with a talent who wants out of the hardships of life in a mining town but needs the support and the backing of the proud men he adores yet watches become more and more broken by the oppressions of the state.

Billy Elliot does not shy away from the reality of the hardship and ill-treatment of the working classes during the miners’ strike of ‘84/85 and this only makes it more powerful and spellbinding. The contrast of the softness and innocence of the children in tutu’s dancing amongst the striking miners and heavy handed baton-wielding Police is powerful and emotive, reminding me of days in the 80’s when my sisters and I would help my Father seal envelops to send for job after job after first striking then being made redundant, unsuccessful time after time, yet never giving up.

Billy Elliot Tour

Billy Elliot is a story of hope, with emotional highs and heart-breaking lows, it is utterly absorbing. it will make you laugh out loud as well as pause an take The talent on stage is simply mind-blowing. With four Billy’s cast on the tour, tonight is the turn of Lewis Smallman to show us he truly was born to boogie. I don’t think any words could do justice to just how incredibly talented this young actor is, the challenges of the role are immense, not only do the boys need to have excellent contemporary dance, tap and ballet skills, but they’ve got to be able to sing and act and all with a Geordie accent! Lewis is totally mesmerising, his sheer talent and commitment to the role brought me to tears as I watched him move, he made for the perfect Billy.

As well as Lewis all the children in the cast are magnificent, with special mention going to Samuel Torpey Billy’s cross-dressing best friend Michael, whose duet with Lewis Smallman on Expressing Yourself is just perfection, funny, fabulous and full of razzle-dazzle, no doubt we will be seeing much more of this incredible talent, a true star in the making, he has the x-factor in bucket loads! Evie Martin takes on the role of Debbie with all the cheeky wit you’d hope for, she is fantastic, sassy and witty with just the right amount of attitude. The adult cast are exceptional too, lump in the throat moments between Billy and his dead Mum are at juxtapose with the scenes of violence and intimidation on the picket line. Annette McLaughlin as Mrs Wilkinson is outstanding, firm and feisty she truly believes in Billy, the scenes between the two are incredibly powerful as she offers a little of the Mother’s touch missing from Billy’s life. Martin Walsh as Billy’s Dad and Scott Garnham as Tony, Billy’s brother are real and believable, hardened by life and the rough hand they have been dealt yet when it comes down to it their love for both Billy and each other shines through.

Billy Elliot Tour

Everything about this production for me was perfection, from Elton John’s sublime score, to the incredible lighting design from Rick Fisher, and as for Peter Darling’s choreography, wow! Totally awe-inspiring, complex and compelling, expressive and moving, I barely blinked for fear of missing anything it just is that good.

Billy Elliot is an absolute triumph of a show, heart-warming, inspiring and utterly mesmerising, it’s very rare you see a whole audience leap up in appreciation but I absolutely guarantee by the time the curtain falls you will be on your feet roaring for more!

On at the Palace Theatre until Saturday 28th January tickets available here;

http://www.atgtickets.com/shows/billy-elliot/palace-theatre-manchester/

Love’s Labour’s Lost

2016_manuel-harlan-_c_rsc_cft_207788-tmb-gal-670

A wonderful additional to this years offerings celebrating 400 years since the death of William Shakespeare, The RSC bring not one but two of the Bard’s works to Manchester this Christmas time. Love’s Labour’s Lost and Much Ado About Nothing, argued by some that the latter is another name for Shakespeare’s missing play, Love’s Labour’s Won, the similarities between the two are plentiful, both being set on a large county estate, sparring couples, masked encounters, mistaken identities and of course hilarious high jinx including overheard and secretly observed sonnets. Playing back to back at Manchester’s Opera House before heading to the Theatre Royal Haymarket , both productions are an absolute triumph.

Opening with the King of Navarre (Sam Alexander) and his three Lords, Berowne (Edward Bennett), Longaville (William Belchambers), and Dumaine (Tunji Kasim), swearing an oath  which includes avoiding contact with women for a lengthy three years, shortly followed by the arrival of the beautiful Princess of France (Leah Whitaker) and her ladies Rosaline (Lisa Dillon), Katharine (Rebecca Collingworth) and Maria (Paige Carter) it soon becomes clear this was an oath that was never going to easily run it’s course. Cue much merriment and classic Shakespearean rhyme while completly against their oath the Lords fall in love with the ladies and of course the King with the Princess.

2016_manuel-harlan-_c_rsc_cft_207794-tmb-gal-670

Don Armado (John Hodgkinson), a Spaniard visiting the King’s court, is also hit by Cupid’s bow, but rather than with a Lady of the court he is taken by Jaquenetta, (Emma Manton) a local dairymaid who has recently been found cavorting with Costard (Nick Haverson) the gardner. So ensues the writing of love notes, delivered of course to the wrong recipient. The unconventional courtships continue with a wonderful scene where we see the King and his Lords disguising themselves as travelling Muscovites which leads to hilarious scenes of Russian dancing and the ladies switching identities themselves through the swapping of favours received by the Lords and the use of elegant masks.

Working with the same company of actors and setting both plays either side of the Great War adds real poignancy to the ending of Love’s Labour’s Lost, sometimes described at the ‘unfinished play’ the merriment and frivolity of the play comes to an abrupt end when the King and his Lord’s head off to war, much as life for many must have been as their young men suddenly headed off to the battlefields of Northern France.

2016_manuel-harlan-_c_rsc_cft_207793-tmb-gal-670

The cast are exceptional, the talent on stage an absolute joy to watch, from Edward Bennett’s brilliant Berowne to John Hodgkinson’s hilarious Don Armado the comic timing and delivering of the Bard’s script is just perfection. Special mention to Peter McGovern whose Moth was magnificent, not to mention his Hercules in the ‘Nine Worthies’ which had the audience in hysterics.

Visually stunning, Simon Higlet’s set is outstanding, with scene changes flowing beautifully due to the ingenious use of a large sliding truck and sub-stage trap. Where Much Ado is festive and twinkling, Love’s Labour’s Lost takes place in the summertime of 1914 when skies are blue and poppies, in a nod to the impending Great War are plentiful. Melody Wood’s luxurious costumes are delightful, perfectly encapsulating the period. The use of music by Nigel Hess, directed by Bob Broad, further enhances this production, filmically underscoring certain moments and offering some challenging vocal pieces which the cast embrace wonderfully.

2016_manuel-harlan-_c_rsc_cft_207789-tmb-gal-670

Love’s Labour’s Lost is an absolute joy, highly entertaining and wonderfully acted. Playing at Manchester’s Opera House until Saturday 3rd December.

http://www.atgtickets.com/shows/loves-labours-lost/opera-house-manchester/

Much Ado About Nothing – Opera House

unnamed
Now that we have witnessed the Royal Shakespeare Company’s Edward Bennett electrocuted inside a giant Christmas tree, the festive season can officially begin!
What better way to mark the conclusion of 2016 – and the 400th anniversary of Shakespeare’s death – than with two of the Bard’s best-loved comedies, played on consecutive nights at the Opera House Manchester, with the same cast?
Director Christopher Luscombe and production manager Paul Hennessey’s grand experiment examines the long-rumoured synergies between Love’s Labour’s Lost and Much Ado About Nothing – setting them in the same country estate (modelled on Charlecote Park, near Shakespeare’s Stratford-upon-Avon) and bookmarking them in summer and winter, before and after the Great War. 
Both deliver a witty, sparring couple; a supporting cast of characters that include a policeman, a curate and many domestic servants; masked encounters between lovers; and – one of Shakespeare’s favourite devices – endless cases of mistaken identity. 
ma
Associate director Guy Unsworth concludes that Shakespeare ‘deliberately shows us two sides of the same coin’ and ‘does indeed want us to view them as an extended double-bill’… Mark thee well!
Anon – immersing ourselves in Much Ado About Nothing’s wintry scenes on a cold Mancunian night – we encounter fast-talking, resolutely single bachelorette Beatrice (Lisa Dillon), who declares: ‘I had rather hear my dog bark at a crow than a man swear he loves me’. The equally marriage-adverse Benedick (Edward Bennett) has just returned from the war, yet it is Beatrice’s quick-fire degradations of his character – spoken at a masked dance – that leave him mortally wounded. 
Their union seems doomed until their eavesdropping antics reveal a surprising fact… they are each madly in love with the other. These revelatory conversations – staged by Benedick and Beatrice’s family and friends, for their benefit – are some of the funniest scenes in the production. Bennett’s comedic antics inside the family Christmas tree solicit great guffaws of appreciation from the audience; it feels inevitable when he breaks the fourth wall – dissolving into barely suppressed laughter himself.  
In another plot, Beatrice’s cousin Hero (Rebecca Collingwood), who radiates chastity and goodness, is due to be married to besotted Claudio (Tunji Kasim); however, he jilts her at the altar when her name is sullied by an accusation of infidelity. With Beatrice and Benedict’s – and Hero and Claudio’s – unions both hanging in the balance, could it be that all hopes rest on hapless constable Dogberry (Nick Haverson) riding to the rescue?
Gripped in a fit of body spasms and crashing around the set, it feels as though he is perilously close to tumbling from the stage; Haverson gives every fibre of his being to the slapstick comedic stylings of Dogberry. Along with Lisa Dillon, his performance is a highlight among the sublime cast – assembled by Gabrielle Dawes and Helena Palmer.  
ma1
Designer Simon Higlett has created a sumptuous Christmas card-style stage – rich, festive and twinkling. His team seamlessly interchange between the house and its grounds by virtue of a large sliding truck and the sub-stage trap. It’s as ingenious as it is beautiful – complemented by Melody Wood’s sumptuous period costumes that brilliantly encapsulate fashion on the cusp of the 1920s. 
This is the second time that composer Nigel Hess has scored the two plays for the RSC, but with exception of a couple of affection quotes, he has revisited them again with completely new music. To further explore the cohesion between the comedies, he uses musical cross-references between the two productions. It’s a triumph, with nuances that complement the on-stage gusto and frivolity to perfection. 
Christmas is a season of laughter and good cheer – and you will find both in these sparkling, immaculate productions by one of our nation’s greatest treasures: the Royal Shakespeare Company. 
Love’s Labour’s Lost and Much Ado About Nothing are on at Opera House Manchester until Saturday, 3 December.

Hair The Musical

for-webhps-003-700x455

Following on from the phenomenal success of Parade earlier this year, Hope Mill Theatre and Aria Entertainment have teamed up once again to bring to cult classic and perhaps the most iconic of all rock musicals Hair to Manchester.

Set in New York’s East Village in the 6o’s at a time when the counter culture of a freedom and peace loving youth was emerging, Hair remains as current and relevant today as it was back in 1967 when it burst onto the New York theatre scene with its message of love, peace and a rejection of conservative America, in particular the controversial Vietnam war. Through Hair we meet a tribe of hippies who passionately believe in a ‘Make Love, Not War’ way of life, turning their backs on the expectations of their families and society and creating their own free love and liberal environment in which to belong. At the heart of the story is Claude and his battle to resist his draft to the army, does he do as his friends have done and live the life he chooses or does he succumb to society’s expectations, rejecting his beliefs of pacifism and freedom by serving for his Country in Vietnam.

The intimate staging of Hope Mill Theatre is perfect for this innovative production. Bold, bright and brilliant Hair is an absolute triumph, each and every member of the cast is exceptional, from the opening number, the much loved Aquarius the cast draw you in and immediately you wish you were part of their tribe. Engaging and totally absorbing Director Jonathan O’Boyle and Choreographer William Whelton have guided this talented cast in the most delightful way, each individual member is given the opportunity to shine, showcasing their incredible talent and then together as an ensemble the impact of the cast as a whole is mesmerising. The staging perfectly sets the scene for this great production, upon entering you are immediately immersed into a colourful, safe and relaxed space, with blankets scattered about in a nod the the original productions be-in. Add to this a stunning score from Galt MacDermot delivered superbly by a small band of five led wonderfully by Musical Director Gareth Bretherton.

It seems almost unfair to single anyone out for special praise from this unbelievably talented tribe but Ryan AndersonBerger, Liam Ross-MillsWoof, Robert MetsonClaude, Laura JohnsonSheila and Natalie GreenMom deliver their roles with a passion thats so wonderful to see. Special mention must also go to Hope Mill Theatre owners Joseph Houston and William Whelton, their drive and determination to bring such quality and innovative theatre to Manchester must be commended, making theatre accessible and more affordable is hugely admirable and they are truly deserving of all the success that has come and no doubt will continue to come their way. The announcement of 2017’s musical theatre programme again in partnership with the wonderful Aria Entertainment has us counting down the days until their next opening night! (Yank! On 9th March in case you’re wondering!)

Hair is an absolute must see, a triumphant piece of theatre, uplifting, absorbing and beautifully symbolic, a timely reminder that love is way more powerful than hate, and ultimately we are all one tribe who really should just love each other.

Hair runs at Hope Mill Theatre until Saturday 3rd December, tickets available here;

HAIR the musical

Jim Steinman’s Bat Out Of Hell – The Musical

booh

Originally released in 1977, Jim Steinman’s Bat Out Of Hell has sold an eye-popping 50 million copies worldwide, making it one of the best-selling albums of all time, if this wasn’t impressive enough 16 years later Bat Out Of Hell II was released, which produced the unstoppable hit I Would Do Anything For Love (But I Won’t Do That).  In 2006 Steinman and Meatloaf triumphed again with the release of Bat Out Of Hell III: The Monster Is Loose. Excitingly for us these three almighty collections with the addition of a newly written chapter have been translated into a new musical which will make its world premiere at Manchester’s Opera House on 17th February 2017 before heading to London’s West End for a limited season.

Originally called Neverland, and based on a futuristic version of Peter Pan which Steinman work-shopped in 1974, Bat Out Of Hell – The Musical has been many years in the planning. Set against the backdrop of a post-cataclysmic city adrift from the mainland we meet Strat (Andrew Polec) the forever young leader of The Lost who has fallen for Raven (Christina Bennington), daughter of Falco (Rob Fowler), the oppressive ruler of Obsidian, who has been locked away in the palace towers. The show takes us on an adventure of romance, rebellion and rock and roll, which features many of the monster hits we all know and love including You Took The Words Right Out Of My Mouth, Bat Out Of Hell, I Would Do Anything For Love (But I Won’t Do That) and Two Out Of Three Ain’t Bad, as well as two previously unreleased songs, What Part of My Body Hurts the Most and Not Allowed to Love.

Manchester was treated to a preview of the show this week when the cast descended on Albert Schloss to perform three tracks from the upcoming show, full of energy and sounding incredible, Polec lead the charge as Manchester audiences were given a taste of what to expect when the show premieres in February. Directed by award-winning theatre and opera director Jay Scheib, Bat Out Of Hell – The Musical is no doubt set to become a theatrical triumph , vibrant, sassy and full of attitude, the cast delivered each song with passion and were brimming with energy and the self-assured confidence you’d wish for from any rock star.

booh1

Adding his support to the new musical was the legendary Meatloaf who spoke of his passion for the music of his great friend Jim Steinman;

“This has been Jim’s dream for 50 years, he wrote Who Needs the Young when he was only 19 years old! The genius of Jim Steinman added to the passion and meaning he puts into his music combined with the feeling it gives you is immeasurable.  Bat Out Of Hell doesn’t belong to me, it doesn’t belong to Jim it belongs to each and every one who listens to it, who performs it, it belongs to you, and now it needs to belong to Andrew Polec who will in turn make it belong to the audience”

Tickets are available now via http://www.atgtickets.com/shows/bat-out-of-hell/opera-house-manchester/

Website: www.batoutofhellmusical.com

17 February – 29 April 2017

Opera House, Manchester

Performances: Mon-Sat at 7.30pm, Thurs & Sat at 2.30pm (no matinee on Sat 18 February)

Tickets: from £17.50

Mind the Gap – Mia

mia-main

Formed in 1988, Mind the Gap is England’s largest learning disability theatre company that creates work for both UK and international audiences. As part of their Daughters of Fortune series, Mia, aims to explore the subject of people with Learning Disabilities becoming parents, expose the myths and expand on the truths.

Mia has just found out she is pregnant, how will she cope? Can she afford it? Will she make a good mum? What if she screws it all up? Questions all new parents would ask themselves, the only difference being non learning disabled parents have the right to make their own choices about their child and are at the heart of all decisions made. Having a Learning Disability means Mia will have to face many assessments, endless meetings and potentially fight for the right to keep her own child, as currently around 40% of parents with a Learning Disability have their child removed, although advocacy groups estimate this figure to be closer to 90%.

Such a monumental subject matter could have the potential to be heavy and difficult to discuss, however Mind the Gap excel at making this sensitive subject accessible and manage perfectly to approach things from a no nonsense and honest point of view. They bring their own unique brand of humour which cleverly pokes fun at the ridiculous and absurd way in which people with Learning Disabilities are at times treated. Director/Devisor Joyce Nga Yu Lee has worked with her performers to deliver a thought-provoking and powerful piece. The four actors Alan Clay, Anna Gray, JoAnne Haines and Alison Short each offer something uniquely special to the production. Each excelling in several roles and delivering with confidence a compelling and engaging piece of theatre. The mock quiz show section Don’t Drop The Baby was a particular highlight, funny and engaging whilst still delivering an important and strong message. With a great amount of well-timed humour, Mia will make you laugh just as much as you’ll feel tears welling as the cast open up about how it feels to be a person with a Learning Disability who may ultimately not have the final say in such a life changing and monumental decision.

Mia is a wonderful piece of theatre, bold, absorbing and engaging, an absolute must see and a credit to all involved.

Home