South Pacific

Reviewed by Matthew Forrest

Opening Night verdict ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️

Credit: Johan Persson

Rather surprisingly that hottest place in Manchester last night wasn’t the mythical island of Bali Ha’i central to the plot of South Pacific (this was due the fabulous air con at the Manchester Opera House), however make no bones about Daniel Evans’s revival of this Roger and Hammerstein classic is one of the hottest tickets in town!

From the much-praised Chichester Festival Theatre production, South Pacific is a dual love story. The first involves a French plantation owner and an American nurse; the second an American GI, and a native Tonkinese woman. All four find themselves on an island in the South Pacific, with the spectre of World War 2 hanging over them. However, it’s not war that threatens their relationships, but their past lives, clashes of culture and most certainly current prejudices that stand in the way of true love.

Credit: Johan Persson

Cards on the table I’ve never seen South Pacific, so seeing racism tackled in such a forthright manner was quite unexpected, especially when the prejudice came in the guise of the production’s ‘heroine’, nurse Ensign Nellie Forbush. When Oscar Hammerstein penned the lyrics to ‘You’ve Got To Be Carefully Taught’ over 70 years ago he hoped that the subject of racial equality would have improved but sadly we’re not quite there yet.

With such a weighty subject matter the production requires some powerhouse performances and lucky for us that’s exactly what we get. Julian Ovenden is in sublime form as plantation owner, Emile de Becque. Charming, charismatic, and tortured, his rendition of ‘This Nearly was Mine’ is the highlight of the night from a show jam-packed with highlights. Opposite him is the equally excellent Gina Beck as Nurse Forbush, a performance packed with energy, like a 4tth of July firework set she draws your attention throughout, radiating warmth and joy which makes the characters prejudices all the more shocking.

Credit: Johan Persson

In addition, there are some fine supporting performances Joanna Ampil puts in a great comedic turn as Bloody Mary, the personification of a survivor, doing all she can to protect herself and family. Whilst Rob Houchen as Lieutenant Cable and Sera Maehra as Liat, bring something wonderfully different to the second love story. Houchen with his delicate vocals on the aforementioned, ‘You’ve Got To Be Carefully Taught’ is superb while Maehara opens the production with a beautifully haunting dance routine, which then feature throughout.

As well as Amil’s Bloody Mary, there is additional light relief from Douggie McMeekin’s scene stealing, Luther Billis, a dodgy GI, with a lot of fingers in a lot of pies, think Dad’s Army’s Private Walker and you’re on the right track.

Credit: Johan Persson

Of course, being such a classic South Pacific has some big ensemble numbers in its arsenal, from the hugely infectious ‘There is Nothin’ Like A Dame’ to the bright and breezy ‘I’m Gonna Wash that Man Right Outa my Hair’, that will have you itching to sing along.

Director Daniel Evans’ South Pacific has a contemporary feel to it and is all you could want from a night at the theatre, fantastic performances, great show tunes and more importantly a social commentary on racism, which sadly still blights society today. 

South Pacific is on at Manchester’s Opera House until Saturday 23rd July tickets available here.

The Cher Show

Reviewed by Jodie Crawford

Opening Night verdict ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️

I’m not sure what I was expecting from “The Cher Show”; but it certainly wasn’t what I got. I have never ever considered myself to be a fan of Cher’s music, but what I learned tonight is that my entire life has been punctuated by Cher songs. You do not realise just how many Cher songs you know until you hear approximately 35 of them and you know every single one. 

The success of this show is the clever use of the three versions of Cher: Star (Debbie Kurup), Lady (Danielle Steers) and Babe (Millie O’Connell). These characters share with us the life story of this incredibly courageous and successful woman – The legend that is Cher.

They take us on a journey together, each representing a different period of Chers life, romantically, professionally, musically and stylistically. But these women are not karaoke versions or impersonators of Cher: yes they each use Cher’s well known mannerisms, such as the hair flick and the sway, but each of them showcase their own talent in their performances, and their talent is MIGHTY.

You cannot compare them to each other, they each stand out for their performances in equal measure. The script, the choreography and the costumes for each are perfection. Each performer supports the other and together they are magical.

The whole cast is spectacular – when Lucas Rush sang his first note as Sonny I was left speechless, his comic timing and chemistry with all three versions of Cher was marvellous. Tori Scott as Cher’s mother was kind, funny and engaging. Special mention to Jake Mitchell as fashion designer Bob Mackie, an all-round performer who the audience loved! I’m embarrassed to say that I had no ideas that Sam Ferriday played as many roles as he did until the curtain call when only one of his characters appeared – four characters played in one production so sleekly is a triumph.

The whole production is intelligent and original. Tom Rogers set design is simple, but powerful. The use of the ensemble to guide us through the eras worked really well. Wigs, hair, make up and costume are all outstanding, everything was flawless. I’m sure Cher herself will be putting in a special request to have some of the outfits flown out to her.

The audience were informed at the beginning of the show that the singing should be left to the cast until the finale – most took this on board, but some just couldn’t help themselves, even I had to hold back when “strong enough” came on!

And then we had the finale – and what a finale it was. It was hands down the finale of all finales, and Manchester lapped it up. Everyone was up on their feet, there was dancing in the aisles, singing along and cheering for the cast and the wonderful orchestration.


Arlene Phillips, Rick Elise and Oti Mabuse have created something magical here, something that will delight audiences again and again and perhaps just give us all a little bit of Cher in our lives when we need it most.

A special little mention to the proud husband of Debbie Kurup, who was sitting behind us, his knowledge of Chers music during the interval was incredible and much appreciated for this Cher convert!

The Cher Show is on at Manchester’s Opera House until Saturday 21st May, tickets available here.

The Addams Family

Reviewed by Alison Ruck

Opening Night verdict ⭐️⭐️⭐️1/2

Everyone’s favourite, kooky, spooky and downright creepy family The Addams, have returned to Manchester. A family everyone knows whether you’ve seen the multiple film adaptations, either cartoon or live action, the various television series or if you remember back to the creation of the family from cartoonist Charles Addams in the 1930s… Everyone is familiar with the crazy family, and of course its catchy theme tune you can’t help but ‘click, click’ along to.

The musical can attract all Addams Family, Halloween and musical theatre fans alike, a bonus that is never a negative when it comes to drawing new audiences into theatres across the country. In this musical version we’re introduced to the gothic Addams Family: Morticia and Gomez the lovingly strange parents, princess of darkness and eldest child Wednesday, and youngest pain-lover, Pugsley. They’re joined by extended family members Uncle Fester, Lurch and Grandma. The family are shocked to hear Wednesday has fallen in love with ‘boy next door’ type Lucas, but when the time comes for both families to meet, the Addams family are forced to act normal as two different worlds collide.

Andrew Lippa, Marshall Brickman and Rick Elice’s 2010 Broadway musical The Addams Family premiered in the UK in 2017. With the book from the writers of Jersey Boys, this show’s shining light is absolutely the writing. It’s clever and injected with witty comedy, funny enough to make the adults titter yet family-friendly enough to engage the kids.

Gomez Addams, played by Cameron Blakely, and Uncle Fester, played by Scott Paige (coincidentally both returning cast members from the original tour) are really the standout characters from the show, with brilliant lines between them combined with the actors’ hilarious embodiments. They have the audience belly laughing – at times for long enough for the actors to have to wait for them to finish – and totally commanding the stage each time they enter.

Joining the cast in 2021 is Joanne Clifton as Morticia Addams. Clifton, most well known for her stint on BBC’s Strictly Come Dancing, takes on the role as the family matriarch. Joanne certainly nails Morticia’s sleek, slender and sexy physicality as she sleuths across the stage in the customary black full-length gown. However, she falls a little flat against some of the more engaging performers such as Blakely; perhaps not quite finding the right balance between the darkness the character needs and the energy a musical needs.

Wednesday Addams is played by Kingsley Morton. The character requires strong vocals, as she takes on some of the best songs in the show, ‘Pulled’ and ‘Crazier Than You’. Despite the stunning vocals from Morton, ‘Pulled’ felt disappointingly shallow, as the performance felt to only scratch the surface of the inner conflict she feels between her family’s traditions and her new love, leaving a sense of restraint from the actress.

Despite not saying much, Lurch is always an audience favourite, played by Ryan Bennett. The tall butler is a continuous comedy character, never really doing much but thanks to the brilliant comedic writing and comedy timing from the cast around him, always achieved a giggle from the audience. 

The musical as a whole does lack the energy and panache that’s enjoyed in your ‘standard’ (jazz hands style) musical theatre production. Albeit purposefully dark and different to fit with the characters and themes, the elements that make the show different take away the ‘wow factor’ from the production. Ironically the most energetic scenes are those led by ‘the dead’ ensemble, and in particular ‘Tango De Amor’ where Clifton lets loose and really impresses with her dance skills in the sharp and sexy Tango.

Despite this, the cast are strong, the witty writing and hilarious performances will have audiences laughing, regardless of age. A great family show with a hint of obscurity and darkness and as crazy as they are, the Addams family can teach us all a little something about love…

You can catch The Addams Family at The Opera House in Manchester until Saturday 23rd April tickets available here.

Joseph and the Amazing Technicolour Dreamcoat

Reviewed by Demi Franks

Opening Night verdict ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️

‘But if you think it, want it, dream it, then it’s real. You are what you feel…’


Fresh from London’s Palladium, this new production of Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat kicks off it’s UK & Ireland tour right here in Manchester. Although it feels as though Joseph has been around since ‘way way back many centuries ago…’ with it being the first of Lloyd Webber and Rice’s musical collaborations to be performed publicly over 50 years ago, originating in 1968 (albeit in a school setting and only 15 minutes in length), it is still as much loved and adored by audiences today as ever.


Joseph, the biblical story of Jacob’s first born (and favourite) son, who is sold by his jealous brothers for being gifted a (pretty fabulous) multi-coloured coat by his father and being a bit of a show off claiming to be able to read people’s dreams… you know the rest, has become not only a staple in schools and colleges alike but theatres and tours around the world too. However this latest version certainly throws a spanner in the works and isn’t afraid of shaking things up…

Yes, this version of Joseph has its ‘star cast’ appeal with Jason Donovan and Alexandra Burke billed as headliners and whilst it must be said the later of which provides an astonishing turn not just as Narrator but doubling up as multiple roles, leading the entire show with panache whilst simultaneously entering her third trimester of pregnancy to our (and probably her own) amazement, this version of Joseph is much more than just names. Paying homage to it’s humble beginnings, at the heart of the show is the talented cast of children, often playing roles you wouldn’t necessary expect them too; they provide a warm and sweet cornerstone to this production.

Jac Yarrow who has quickly made a name for himself in the title role, is most certainly the real deal. His onstage charisma is matched by his sensational vocals, with his version of Close Every Door proving to be ‘goose-pimpley-good’ and providing a stand-out moment. The ensemble are tight and slick and deliver some of the most entertaining scenes of the evening, including One More Angel In Heaven and Go, Go, Go Joseph.

A first class creative team has also been assembled here with Laurence Connor directing at the helm. Large’s set and costume design provides all the colour and more that you’d expect from a production of Joseph, whilst Rigby’s orchestra hits powerful perfection with every note, remaining pitch perfect throughout, culminating in Act 2’s Entr’acte getting its own (and much deserved) rapturous applause from an eager audience still clearly lapping up being back watching live theatre. However, what is most revolutionary for me is Hunter’s choreography which adapts and evolves impressively at each modern twist the production takes.

Michael Harrison’s refashioned production keeps the sentimentality and romanticism that a production of Joseph should have, whilst at the same time re-invigorates and brings it up-to-date, with (spoiler alert) tap-dance, cheerleading and can-can routines thrown in for good
measure. Although it may be said at times the modernisation can seem a little over the top and in your face, making it occasionally hard to digest, this newest production certainly can’t be accused of resting on its laurels.

There is still something really warm and reminiscent at the core of this modernised updated version of a much loved classic, that particularly in a world currently full of so much uncertainly, feels hugely soothing, nostalgic and incredibly uplifting.

This newest interpretation of Joseph certainly throws some curve balls to what we are used to expecting with this one, however what we do get is a quirky, funny, bold, modern take on an old familiar musical tale, which certainly makes for an entertaining evening!

Joseph And The Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat is at the Manchester Opera House until the 2nd tickets are available here.

The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time

Reviewed by Nikki Cotter

Opening Night verdict ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️

The National Theatre’s multi award-winning production The Curious Incident of the Dog in The Night-Time, retuned to the North West this week, taking up residency until Saturday 12th March at Manchester’s Opera House.

The stage adaptation of Mark Haddon’s international best-selling novel is both captivating and deeply moving. Telling the story of fifteen-year-old Christopher Boone (David Breeds) who at the very beginning of the play discovers the murder of his neighbour’s dog, Wellington. Immediately under suspicion himself, Christopher sets about on a thorough and detailed investigation to discover exactly who has caused Wellington’s demise.

Christopher is an extraordinary boy; complex and remarkable; he sees the world in super fine detail. Colours are more vivid, sounds are louder, people are confusing, and the world is often a very overwhelming place.

As the story develops, we learn more about Christopher’s complexities as he struggles with communication and physical touch, even from his parents in the most difficult of situations. This proves extremely challenging for his parents at times, which results in an extremely powerful alternative connection being portrayed where he uses only his fingertips to connect with them. You can really feel the pain his mother is going through in these scenes which are beautifully portrayed.

David Breeds makes for an excellent Christopher, physically giving his all to the role you desperately want him to succeed and are utterly transfixed by his every move. His interaction with his schoolteacher Siobhan portrayed perfectly by Rebecca Root is wonderful, this gorgeous pairing really complement each other, her belief in his abilities is unshakable while her ability to calm him when life gets overwhelming is truly special.

Movement is a huge part of what makes this play so exceptional, Director Marianne Elliot along with Movement Directors Scott Graham, Steven Hoggett and Adrian Sutton have created something extremely memorable. The piece is visually stunning while the cast mesmerise as their fluid movement is seamless throughout.

Designer Bunny Christie, Lighting Designer Paule Constable, Video Designer Finn Ross and Sound Designer Ian Dickinson give the audience a remarkable insight into the heightened sensory world Christopher lives in. A real standout scene being when Christopher goes on a journey to London. The use of sound, lighting and physical theatre really brings the busy, bustling London Underground to life and allows us to see the world through Christopher’s eyes. It shows starkly just how harrowing navigating the world can be with a social disorder.

This thought-provoking, funny, inspiring play proves once again why it’s one of The National Theatre’s most loved productions. It’s full of heart, packed with humour and most importantly hope. Visually stunning with unforgettable storytelling, Curious Incident is theatre at its finest.

The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time is on at Manchester’s Opera House until Saturday 12th March, tickets available here.

Footloose

Reviewed by Alison Ruck

Opening Night verdict ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️

Everybody cut loose… Footloose has returned to Manchester!

The feel-good all singing, all dancing musical follows the story of teenage rebel Ren McCormack who arrives in the small town of Bomont, and to his dismay finds that music, dancing and rock n roll is banned following a tragedy that struck the town 5 years prior. Ren, along with the town’s teenagers, take matters into their own hands and fight to bring joy back to the town. And what brings more joy than dancing!

The cast is led by Joshua Hawkins as Ren McCormack, the charming big city boy who shakes up the small town. Joshua is joined by Lucy Munden as the girl next door-cum-hellraiser Ariel Moore. The duo make a good pair and their effortlessly beautiful voices shine, particularly within their romantic duet ‘Almost Paradise’.

The leads are joined by TV personality, and star of numerous West End productions, Darren Day, as the firm Reverend Shaw Moore. Darren gave a strong performance, but the character as a whole leaves something to be desired. The deep scenes only seem to scratch the surface of the emotion that could be portrayed, although Day’s musicality and voice hold its own within this very talented cast.

The biggest surprise and star of the show has to be Jake Quickenden in the role of Willard Hewitt. Quickenden – best known for his role in Hollyoaks, winner of Dancing on Ice and previous Dream Boy – is a great fit for the role of tough boy Willard, really giving the character the energy and spark it needs and deserves. His comedy was sincere and easy and he displayed top notch vocals and dancing whilst even playing guitar on stage too.

One of the best elements of the show has to be the musicality that runs through the core of the production, as each member of the cast take on the role of orchestra within the midst of the onstage action. From flutes to guitar and saxophones, the cast wows as they bring the music right into the story. Not only playing an instrument but singing and dancing whilst doing so, making the cast not only triple threats but quadruple threats (if that’s even a thing?).

The choreography is fun and athletic, with lots of playful thrusting and the odd typical 80’s dance move thrown in, simply adding to the overall joyous nature of the musical.

The cast is very small, which sometimes can be felt in the dance numbers, as it misses the full stage production feel that can be expected with such large-scale musicals. With a main cast of 6 doing most of the dancing throughout, as other cast members do their best to join in whilst playing instruments, this does restrict the energy and scope of the choreography.

If you’re familiar with the film version, either the 1980’s Kevin Bacon classic or the more modern 2011 remake, you’ll know the musical features 80’s pop hits such as ‘Holding Out for a Hero, ‘Almost Paradise’, ‘Let’s Hear It For The Boy’ and of course the unforgettable title track ‘Footloose’. However, the other songs are more than forgettable in-between, which really holds the production back from its full potential.

Despite this, the songs that are known and loved from the show are its stand out moments. ‘Lets Hear it For The Boys’ is a real crowd pleaser – and not only because the audience is treated to a dance from a particularly popular cast member in gold hot pants…

‘Holding Out For A Hero’ is the perfect female powerhouse song, bringing together the wonderful voices of Lucy Munden, Oonagh Cox and Jess Barker combined with some pure 80’s music video vibes.

Overall Footloose is a joyful spectacle that will leave your toes tapping and face smiling. Just as in the story, the musical will remind you how amazing it can feel to really let loose and dance the night away.

You can catch Footloose at the Opera House, Manchester until Saturday 5th March, tickets available here.

Fatal Attraction

Reviewed by Paris Rogers

Opening Night verdict ⭐️⭐️⭐️

I feel lucky that I’ve not watched Fatal Attraction via Film or in the theatre before. It allowed me to have a completely clear slate and no comparison when writing this review.

Fatal Attraction by James Dearden follows Alex Forrest (Kym Marsh) as she takes us on an absolute roller-coaster of emotions ending in becoming unhealthy obsessed with Dan Gallagher (Oliver Farnworth) all resulting from a one night stand. 

The play had an extremely strong start, drawing me in with a spotlight on Dan Gallagher. His voice was clear and crisp and had a way of silencing the audience into their seats. It also started, light, upbeat and with Dan Gallagher in a happy marriage to Beth (Susie Amy). I sometimes struggle to gauge what’s going on in the beginning of a play and what relationship the characters have but the stereotypical marriage between the two was clear from the start and portrayed nicely on stage.

The set was almost black box theatre. Simple yet effective. The simplicity encouraged the audience to use more of their imagination and focus on the actors. It also permitted incredibly smooth scene changes. Video calls were used to transform the story from the 1980’s to modern day. I felt this was not needed and took the focus away from the dialogue and flow of the play. It felt awkward and pardon the pun, staged. However, I can understand that it is difficult to bring every scene of the film to the stage, these calls were a quick interject to keep the story moving.

There was an incredible amount of background noise used which set the scene but again took away the focus from the actors. I felt they had to work twice as hard to carry the scene along. This sometimes came across rushed and their accent fell now and then. 

Speaking of which, it is difficult enough to see facial expressions on stage without a lump of hair constantly covering an actor’s face. This meant the actors body language had an even greater role to play. At times this disappointingly did not match the dialogue. There were uncomfortable movements, especially walks off stage and jarred hand gestures throughout. 

One of the most iconic scenes in the film fell flat in the stage adaptation, when Dans wife Beth discovers her daughters pet rabbit has been boiled alive. I’m not certain how I would react if I found a cute bunny boiled on my stove, but I it wouldn’t be a single scream.

In comparison, Marsh put buckets of detail into her performance as Alex. The dialogue and scenes she had to deliver were undeniably challenging but she managed to make me feel compassion for her even at the evillest parts of her actions. Her approach to the character was not only exceptionally clever and thought through but made me constantly question her motives. Was she just ill and been taken advantage of or was she a calculated woman with hatred for men running through her veins? 

The ending to the play allowed me to interrogate two different scenarios in my mind. This permitted ongoing questions after leaving the theatre. The street was filled with different views and endings, it clearly provoked debates and conversations during and after.

Fatal Attraction is on at the Opera House until Saturday 26th February tickets available here.

Grease

Reviewed by Demi Franks

Opening Night verdict ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️

“If you’re having fun then you’re Number one!”  proclaims a certain Mr. Peter Andre as Vince Fontaine to a packed out Manchester Opera House – and boy he wasn’t wrong!

This Tuesday evening Quay Street was buzzing with excitement and that wasn’t just because it had actually managed to stop raining for an hour, but probably to do with the fact that yes it’s still an absolute treat to have live theatre return to the heart of the city. Amongst the many excitable attendees queuing to take their seats were multiple sets of Manchester’s own Pink Ladies, whom will have waited patiently for over a year to see this latest production.

Although now synonymous with the Travolta/Newton-John illustrious partnership, it’s easy to forget Grease the movie actually succeeded the theatrical production’s New York debut by six years. However, the story of the Pink Ladies and the Burger Palace Boys (the original T-Birds) and their subsequent trials and tribulations as they make the painstaking journey from adolescence to adulthood, still lies at the heart of this cult classic.

Nikolai Foster’s production, originally planned for 2020, but halted due to the Covid pandemic, clearly pays homage to the production’s original predecessors. Foster does a superb job at bringing together all the elements to make this a great comeback for the latest UK touring production.

The production is a visual delight, the characters look every bit the part; the jeans, the jackets and the ‘Grease-y’ hair styles are out in full force. All of which is smoothly complimented by Richmond’s clever and versatile set design, which centres around a 1950’s school gym, manoeuvring and evolving throughout, becoming the school hall, canteen, the local diner, the girls’ bedroom etc. accordingly.

Equally, it’s pure joy to watch Arlene Phillips’ Choreography, which again brilliantly honours the original era, but also packs a little extra punch with some modern elements sprinkled in, providing us with some stand-out ‘WOW’ ensemble moments, including the dance break of both ‘Greased Lightning and ‘We Go Together.

Musically the production was faultless; beautifully arranged by Travis and directed by Glover to get the best out of both the band and the vocal harmonies. It’s easy to forget amongst the classic sing-along smash-hits that there are some delightfully stunning little melodies gifted within the score. Doody’s (Alex Christian) rendition of ‘Those Magic Changes’ produced a beautifully sweet moment, sensitively crafted and wonderfully performed.

Leading the cast, Dan Partridge excellently personifies Danny Zuko with the poise and self-assurance needed, together with Ellie Kingdon (alternate Sandy) whom whilst making her professional debut on this production, stepped in as Sandy for tonight’s performance with hours to spare as part of a couple of last minute cast changes, simultaneously managing to deliver one of the most powerful Hopelessly Devoted To Yous I have ever witnessed, fully deserving the rapturous applause she received at the end of the number.

The cast as a whole are bright, exuberant and energetic, they constantly drive the show forward with confidence and charisma, most certainly breathing fresh life into this old classic. It is utterly refreshing watching this dynamic and vibrant cast doing their thing! Whom, apart from Andre, who did in fact deliver a rather good all-round charming performance once he came down from his raised DJ booth and onto the stage in Act 2, mainly consists of a relatively unknown, fresh, young group of thriving triple threat musical theatre actors.

Although special mention has to go to the ‘scene-stealing’ Jan and Roger (played by Byrne and Barnett respectively), both of which embody these two hilariously-sweet characters so wonderfully.

At times this production veers slightly away from the recognisable ground that die-hard Grease fanatics would be expecting, with a few chop and changes along the way and the inclusion of some lesser known musical numbers. However at the centre of this production remains the same familiar, loveable, funny, warming story of the Rydell High class of 1959.

Forget your Pumpkin Spiced Lattes…this is certainly not only the one that you want, but the one that you need to lift your spirits and give you that warm fuzzy feeling this Autumn.

Grease runs at the Opera House Manchester until 23rd October tickets available here.

The Rocky Horror Show

Reviewed by Nicky Jones

Opening Night verdict ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️

Manchester’s Opera House re-opening week has been filled with glitz, glamour and fabulous fancy dress – the raucous Rocky Horror Show is back in town on Manchester Pride week!

As we headed into the venue surrounded by fishnet stockings, French maid’s outfits and copious amounts of sparkle, it was certain we were in for an incredible night of entertainment.

Rapidly heading towards its 50th anniversary, cult phenomenon The Rocky Horror Show is still as popular as ever. Even before the show began the audience erupted in cheers and applause, as the best-dressed audience member stole the limelight – entering the auditorium in his very own fabulous Frank-N-Furter costume.

The show begins with high energy from the audience, as the opening number Science Fiction/Double Feature proved a big hit. The story begins with Janet (Hayley Flaherty) and Brad (Ore Oduba)’s day not really going as planned, as the prim and proper couple break down in their car and attempt to seek help at the creepy castle two miles down the road. Considering all they wanted to do was borrow a phone, the pair get a lot more than they bargained for.

The show really kicks in once we meet Frank-N-Furter (Stephen Webb) and the full ensemble – everybody was up dancing and singing along within the first 30 minutes of the show. There was no waiting for the inevitable Time Warp curtain call here! The audience also built up a gorgeous atmosphere during Brad and Janet’s A Light Over at the Frankenstein Place, taking out their phone torches and glow sticks out for the number.

A stand-out performance comes from Narrator – Philip Franks. His quick wit, cheeky jokes and comedic timing had the audience shouting out heckles from his first line, and his jokes rely on an equally quick-witted loyal audience playing along with him. He did not get caught out once, and he gave it back as quick as he got it!

The Time Warp arrived in the show much earlier than I expected, and it had the whole auditorium up and dancing. Frank-N-Furter’s entrance was another stand out moment, with Sweet Transvestite being lapped up by the audience. It was raunchy, sassy and vocally powerful.

The creative team have done a superb job to create such a visually stunning show, from the set to the costumes. The set transitions beautifully from rainy windswept roads to the castle interior, and each one sets the scene perfectly. The costumes have a modern twist, but keep a close match to the character’s classic outfits from the original 1975 film. All of the costumes are clearly well loved throughout the show’s loyal fanbase, with some remarkable fancy dress being showcased within the auditorium and all over the cities bars following the show, I’m sure.

This show is a guaranteed party which features many timeless classics, including the show-stopping Time Warp. Catch The Rocky Horror Show in Manchester until Sunday 29th August – it’s the perfect way to start your Pride weekend! Tickets available here: https://www.atgtickets.com/shows/the-rocky-horror-show/opera-house-manchester/

RuPaul’s Drag Race UK Queen’s sashay into Manchester!

Join the queens of RuPaul’s Drag Race UK for an evening of endless eleganza extravaganza as this brand-new tour takes in 19 theatres and venues across England, Scotland and Wales including a date at Manchester Opera House on February 12.

Acclaimed for their amazing production values, expect the unexpected in this glittering tour featuring UK Season 2 Finalists Tayce, Bimini Bon Boulash, Dundee’s Ellie Diamond and WINNER Lawrence Chaney from Glasgow, along with stars from Drag Race UK.

Ben Hatton, Director of Theatre Touring for Cuffe and Taylor, said: “We are thrilled to be working with the Voss Events Team for what will be Drag Race’s biggest ever UK theatre tour.

“RuPaul’s Drag Race is an exciting show and is always a huge hit so we look forward to presenting a series of outrageously entertaining shows.”

Tickets start at £35 and there are exclusive VIP options where guests can enjoy a private meet and greet with the queens before the show!

Tickets go on general sale 10am Friday 26th March RuPaul’s Drag Race UK Tickets | Opera House Manchester in Manchester | ATG Tickets

Snow White

Reviewed by Nikki Cotter

Opening Night verdict ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️

When it comes to family fun Qdos Entertainment don’t do things by halves. Delivering Manchester Opera House’s pantomime for the third successive year they give audiences another Christmas cracker of a show in which no expense is spared; a glittering and gaaawwwjus production of Snow White starring Strictly’s very own Craig Revel Horwood.

This festive extravaganza has everything you’d want from a Panto, lavish sets, elaborate costumes and lots and lots of laughs. Writer Alan McHugh (with additional material from Ben Nickless) ensures the script is teaming with Mancunian references from the wonderful opening number playing homage to the Opera House to the tune of The Lambeth Walk to the ‘mad for it!’ Magnificent Seven who are ready to ‘ave it!’ all night long!

Pic copyright Phil Tragen 2019

Revel Horwood makes for a deliciously devilish baddie, fabulously theatrical and outrageously naughty as wicked Queen Lurcretia he commands the stage throughout. Strutting, preening and pouting before belting out his several solos with style and some serious sass proving what an incredibly talented all-rounder he truly is.

There is strong support from audience favourite Ben Nickless who returns for the second year running, this time playing the hapless Muddles along with a welcome return for Manchester’s favourite Dame, Eric Potts who makes for a magnificent Nora Crumble. The two bounce off each other brilliantly, their silly humour and cheeky charm is measured just right for this family audience. They bring this classic story bang up to date with hilarious mentions of Donald Trump, Boris Johnson and there’s even a scene with a over keen Alexa!

Zoë George and Joshua St Clair make for a perfect pairing as Snow White and the dashing Prince Harry. Although a little underused when we do hear from them their vocals are superb and they both have bucketloads of charm.

The ensemble cast and young company add to the spectacle of the lavish numbers with slick delivery of Ashley Nottingham’s choreography, great to see some same-sex pairings on stage during the dance numbers too.

Pic copyright Phil Tragen 2019

Of course as to be expected with Panto there are some cheeky moments with a few close to the bone one-liners however the innuendo never goes too far & is pitched at just the right level to give the adults a giggle while the kids laugh along with the slapstick and physical comedy that’s so brilliantly delivered.

Revel Horwood, Potts, Nickless & St Clare’s riotous version of The Twelve Days of Christmas brings the house down quite literally, it is pure panto perfection!

The combination of impressive special effects, classic panto entertainment and a wonderfully talented cast result in another hit for Qdos.

Snow White is a riotous romp of camp, colourful, comedy, a FAB-U-LOUS night out for all the family.

Pic copyright Phil Tragen 2019

Snow White is on at Manchester’s Opera House until Sunday 29th December tickets available here.

 

& Juliet

Reviewed by Nikki Cotter

Opening Night verdict ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️

Some jukebox musicals come and go faster than you can say Hit Me Baby One More Time others like Mamma Mia really hit the spot becoming staples of the theatre scene; enter new kid on the block & Juliet a magnificent mash-up of legendary songwriter Max Martin’s biggest hits which judging by tonight’s thunderous standing ovation is without doubt here to stay.

Bursting into vibrant life with opening number ‘Larger Than Life’ & Juliet directed by Luke Sheppard gives an absolute masterclass in musical theatre. Visually stunning and with a cast that reads like a who’s who of theatre royalty & Juliet takes you on a joyous ride of empowerment, uplifting fun and star quality sass.

Forget what you know about Romeo & Juliet, this fresh production transforms the Bard’s tragic tale as Anne Hathaway (played spectacularly by Cassidy Janson) tells husband William Shakespeare (an impressive Oliver Tompsett) that his ending for the star-crossed lovers is…well basically shit; thus opening the gates for Juliet’s journey of sensational self-discovery as she explores for the first time what it means to truly get a life!

Oliver Tompsett and Cassidy Janson take on part narrator part player roles as the two inventively weave themselves into the narrative, influencing and entertaining throughout. Tompsett makes for a determined, unwavering Shakespeare that is until wife Anne (Cassidy Janson) takes his quill and sets about influencing not only Juliet’s but her own story. Both are perfectly cast, they spark wonderfully off each other with razor sharp comedic timing and genuinely warm wit.

Miriam-Teak Lee is simply outstanding as Juliet, giving an absolutely world-class performance, delivering powerhouse vocals with ease while her warm charisma combined with instant likability gets the audience immediately on side. It’s a thrill to join her on this fabulous ride as we will this fine heroine to find her own happy ending.

Best friend May is played beautifully by Arun Blair-Mangat his raw fragility when delivering Britney’s much-loved ‘I’m Not a Girl, Not Yet a Woman’ is packed with genuine heart and gut-wrenching emotion while Tim Mahendran is excellent as love interest Francois adding a perfect twist to proceedings while taking the story to another unexpected level.

Special mention must go to David Badella and Melanie La Barrie as Lance and Nurse who are quite simply a joy to watch, bringing the house down during their outrageously funny duet Teenage Dream/Break Free. Jordan Luke Gage introduces us to a very different kind of Romeo, an empty-headed heartthrob who may not be quite as innocent as he seems, Gage thrills with his spectacular arrival while his hilarious doe-eyed dorkish delivery is lapped up by the audience.

No review of the show would be complete without heaping praise on the insanely talented ensemble who look like they are having the time of their lives on stage. They deliver Jennifer Weber’s slick choreography with precision and a sass Beyoncé would be proud of just when you think they couldn’t get any better they crank it up a notch more, absolutely stunning.

Set designer Soutra Gilmour has created something epic here as the constantly evolving set continues to surprise while Paloma Young’s stunning costume design is a glorious meeting of period mixed with modern, think intricately detailed corsets teamed with sumptuous sports luxe and you’re halfway there.

It’s hard to believe the songs featured weren’t specifically written for the show Bill Sherman and Dominic Fallacaro’s arrangements of Max Martin’s mega hits fit the show like a glove while David West Read’s script finds a measured balance between hilariously funny and touchingly tender.

& Juliet is the musical we need right now, the ultimate in feel-good fun offering a joyous night of escapism while tackling modern themes with positivity and truth. You’ll laugh, you’ll cry, you’ll dance your socks off before leaving with the biggest smile on your face with a heart well and truly warmed. Sensational fun from the first beat, we absolutely want Shakespeare that way!

& Juliet is on at the Manchester Opera House until Saturday 12th October before it moves to London’s Shaftesbury Theatre tickers available here.