Closets

Opening Night verdict ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️

Writer Nikki Cotter

Written by Lloyd Eyre-Morgan and Neil Ely, Closets is an emotive and colourfully courageous journey of self-discovery, strength and celebration.

It’s 1988 and 16 year old Henry (Sam Redford) is struggling to express freely who he is for fear of his bolshy Mum’s (Hayley Tamaddon) refusal to accept his sexuality. In a desperate bid to disappear and escape the daily battles Henry steps inside his closet, travelling forward in time to the very same bedroom 20 years later where he finds shy, tormented Ben (Lloyd Daniels). The year may be different but the difficulties are the same. So begins a coming-of-age journey of exploration as Hope Mill Theatre becomes the scene of the 1969 Stone Wall Riots, Ben’s school toilets and modern day Manchester as the boys travel through time experiencing life defining moments along the way.

Closets is a cleverly constructed, deeply emotive and heart-warmingly joyful piece of theatre. The story touches on many relatable themes such as bullying, suicide and first love as we are swept along on a rollercoaster on emotions. The lovingly crafted script focusses not only on challenges faced by the LGBTQ+ community but examines changing attitudes across the years in an honest and relatable way.

Sam Retford is exceptional as Henry, hard to believe this is his musical debut; his performance is confident and assured, engaging the audience entirely. Complementing Retford perfectly is X-Factor’s Lloyd Daniels, as the quiet but tormented Ben whose heartfelt delivery of Neil Ely, Lloyd Eyre-Morgan and Jack Bennetts lyrics packs an emotional punch.

Hayley Tammerdon shines as Henry’s Mum Susan, confused and angry she gives an honest & engaging portrayal of a mother who is ultimately scared of losing her son. Adding many delightful slices of humour is the sensational Sophie Ellicott, she brings genuine wit and laugh out loud joy to the production, her delivery of Protection is a real highlight of the show.

Special mention must also go to powerhouse Kim Tatum, her soulful delivery and witty one-lines add further depth and poignancy to the story.

Ashley M A Walsh’s score creates the perfect soundtrack to this relevant and thought-provoking journey through both hostile and happy times. The 13 original songs ranging from up beat pop numbers to contemporary ballads evoke the sounds of the 80’s perfectly. While Joseph Thomas perfectly lights William Whelton’s punchy choreography.

Closets strikes the perfect balance, delivering both humour and powerful drama, highs are beautifully woven into emotion lows ensuring the story is told with sensitivity and real heart. There is little to criticise here, a quickening up of a couple of scene changes and some tightening tweaks here and there would very quickly take this already brilliant show to the next level, but none of this affects your enjoyment of this uplifting piece of theatre in which the message of love and loving freely is strong, powerful and perfectly judged.

Closets is on at Hope Mill Theatre until Thursday 23rd August, tickets available here.

Dancing Bear

Dancing Bear 1 credit Matt Tullett

Opening Night Verdict

As part of the Queer Contact Festival 2018, Jamie Fletcher & Company and Contact bring their dramatized musical, Dancing Bear to Manchester’s Palace theatre for two nights ahead of further dates at the West Yorkshire Playhouse in April.

Conceived by director/musician Jamie Fletcher and writer/musician Beccy Owen, Dancing Bear is an unflinchingly provocative piece of theatre which examines the navigation of daily life for many LGBTQ+ individuals while focussing on their individual challenges and fight for inclusivity, acceptance and a sense of spiritual peace in whatever forms that may take.

Each member of the company is given time and space to deliver their story, ensuring from the start we see each person as an entirely unique and special being. Stories are shared, some happy some painfully sad, offering an opportunity to reflect and consider our own views and experiences. A wonderful addition to the show is the inclusion of Katie, a BSL Interpreter who is wholly part of the company and who testifies like each other cast member.

Dancing Bear 2 credit Matt Tullett

The honest and personal testimonies are interwoven with an inspired piece of poetry in which we see the Dancing Bear move through various animal communities in a bid to find his people after being banished by his family; he yearns for somewhere he feels safe, loved, accepted and free to be the person he knows he truly is inside.

Whilst the show implores you to question and explore it also entertains enormously, with superb original songs and powerful contemporary dance in addition to the real-life stories, there is a wonderful cabaret vibe to the production. There is no preaching, nor pushing of an agenda other than delivering a message illustrating the importance of love and acceptance. The glorious array of individuals on stage wonderfully demonstrates our strength as individuals lies in acceptance and the grace to embrace difference in all its forms. In exploring faith it becomes wonderfully clear that to each individual God can be exactly what they want God to be, a powerful being in which faith can be placed. Poignant, provocative and an opportunity to find our own inner peace & spirituality on our own terms, conclusions need not be drawn as we celebrate the uniqueness of each other.

On at the Palace theatre 8pm this evening tickets can be found here.