Henry V

Reviewed by Nikki Cotter

Opening Night verdict ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️

Petty political point-scoring, a none democratically elected leader making decisions shaping the future of our nation, decisions driven by a lust for power…sound familiar? Nope this isn’t a political commentary of the UK right now but Shakespeare’s Henry V.

Director Loveday Ingram places the production amidst the current political climate, (or should that be crisis?) St George’s crosses fly high as soldiers swill down booze while chants of ‘England ’til I die’ ring out from the yellow vests.

Shakespeare’s France very much represents the EU with the cast dressed in familiar vibrant blue as yellow starts billow in the breeze.

It may be 2019 but Henry V feels more pertinent now than ever before as Shakespeare’s social and political observations continue to ring true, centuries after they were first penned.

Joseph Millson takes on the role of the heroic leader. Persuasive and full of charm one moment, ruthless and murderous the next. Millson revels in the complexity of the monarch exploring every layer with subtlety and style.

He tackles Shakespeare’s famous “Once more to the breach, dear friends” monologue with a solid and rousing conviction: his army literally chomping at the bit, breathless for the battle to begin. In contrast the commanding warrior loses all composure when attempting to woo Katherine, faltering over his words as he bashfully fumbles in French.

Millson is supported by an impressively strong cast notably Samuel Collings as Pistol, Seren Vickers as Fluellen and Vanessa Schofield as Scroop/High Constable while Mitesh Soni and Sarah-Jane Potts inject some well delivered humour as Alice and Katherine.

Director Loveday Ingram and her cast not only find the heart of Henry V but also the humour too in this solid and potent production as keen observations of the human spirit play out.

Vulnerabilities of leaders are masked with chest pumping and posturing while the battlefield scenes remind us of the catastrophic consequences of decisions driven by political self-promotion. The scene after the battle of Agincourt packing a deeply emotional punch as the cast hauntingly sing to the skies.

Andrew Patterson’s dynamic lighting design adds atmosphere and depth while Paul Benzing’s fight direction adds authenticity and impact.

This is a cleverly constructed piece which will stay with audiences long after viewing. Vibrant storytelling at its finest.

Henry V is on at Grosvenor Park Open Air Theatre until Sunday 25th August tickets available here.

Twelfth Night

Reviewed by Nikki Cotter

Opening Night verdict ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️

Twelfth Night has long been known as one of Shakespeare’s greatest comedies; in celebration of their 10th birthday Grosvenor Open Air Theatre are happy to prove why.

Locating the action in the Bohemian Balkans the celebratory festival vibe is strong, there’s flowers in hair while the drink is free flowing. The abundance of music and laughter indicate that Director Julia Thomas is prepared embrace the fun of this comedic and jubilant production.

This is an ode to the joyful and silly; there’s mistaken identities, unrequited love, a shipwreck, subterfuge as well as a whole host of entertaining characters.

The talented cast deliver Shakespeare’s verse with clear conviction while their enthusiasm and wit gives the piece both a light and accessible feel.

Separated twins Viola (Whitney Kehinde) and Sebastian (Marc Benga) each arrive on the shores of Illyria after a shipwreck; Viola first, allowing her 3 days of getting acquainted with the locals, enough time for two to fall in love with her while another two attempt to fight her albeit while she’s now dressed as as a man (Cesario) in a bid to keep the spirit of the brother she believes to be dead alive.

Kehinde is excellent as Viola/Cesario, cool and commanding she handles the confusion and complexities of life in Illyria with sass and style.

Sarah-Jane Potts shines as Olivia, hot in pursuit of her happy ending while Samuel Collings brings the house down as the put upon Malvolio whose transformation from stiff upper lipped steward to stocking wearing, downward dog facing smiler is pure genius.

Mitesh Soni is an absolute joy as Sir Andrew Aguecheek. His physical comedy, facial expressions and nice but dim personality really bringing this piece to life. Kudos to Soni for successfully delivering Shakespeare’s prose whilst flossing, impressive!

Jessica Dives as Feste takes on the form of a modern day wandering minstrel, offering an almost narrator like musical accompaniment while adding a wonderfully melodic energy to proceedings.

Director Julia Thomas isn’t afraid to embrace the silly or the slapstick and is greatly rewarded for her choices. Her cast embrace the opportunity, having a lot of fun with the piece while the audience reap the benefits.

A stand out moment which really embodies the playful nature of the production is the hilarious fight scene, outrageously farcical and absolute comedy perfection. The frequent witty exchanges between cast and audience further add to the playfulness and accessibility of this piece.

A highlight of Chester’s summer season for ten years now with productions as strong as this there is no doubt the Grosvenor Park Open Air Theatre will be celebrating birthdays for many years to come.

Outrageously good fun for all the family.

Twelfth Night is being performed at various dates over the summer further information and tickets can be found here.