Mojo

Reviewed by Matt Forrest

Opening Night verdict ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️

With the super talented Jez Butterworth’s latest offering The Ferryman currently wowing audiences and critics on Broadway, it’s always worth paying a visit to some of his earlier work and the WonderIf production of Butterworth’s first play, Mojo.

Originally set in the 1950s seedy club scene of Soho, this version sees the action shift to the ecstasy-fuelled club scene of 1990’s Manchester.  Manchester at the time resembled a Western, as rival gangs battled for control of the doors and of course the drug scene, so this narrative shift works perfectly.

The first act opens at the Atlantic club and certainly belongsto Potts (Paul Jennings) and Sweets (Leigh Manning) as the pair muse about how the good times are coming back, especially with the potential success of Silver Johnny (Edrine Spencer), a local singer/dancer the boys helped to discover things are certainly on the up.

Later club skivvy Skinny (Oliver Baines) and Baby (Scott Harrison) join the party. Early doors we can see cracks in the relationship of these four, as Baby’s toxic masculinity oozes out of him especially as it relates to his treatment of Skinny.  However, the situation takes a more sinister turn with the arrival of the club manager Mickey (Miles Mooney) who informs the gang that club owner, and Baby’s father, Ezra has been murdered and is in the bins outside the club.

In addition,their golden goose Silver  Johnny is missing. The gang decide to lay low in the club to see how the situation plays out and defend their territory, but with tensions running high, personal vendettas, bruised egos, and certain group members manipulating the situation for their own gain, it’s pretty clear that not everything will end well for this dysfunctional quintet.

This is pitch black comedy that looks at the battle for supremacy and the pecking order of a group of wanna be tough guys: there is always a hierarchy in place. The script is packed with stinging dialogue and cutting one liners, with a plenty of dark humour to boot.

All six performers work well as an ensemble, demonstrating who their character is and just where they  fit into in the group’s structure, I do think some of the performances could be reined in a touch and played less for laughs as it loses sight of the more dramatic elements of the play. In addition, there are still references to the action taking place in London rather than it’s new setting of Manchester which did get a little confusing.

Overall this is an entertaining, engaging night at the theatre, with numerous twists and turns that will leave you guessing how it will end. In addition, the show has a killer soundtrack, featuring the likes of New Order, Joy Division and Happy Monday’s, that you really can’t go far wrong. This is a must for fans of the gangster genre, and anyone who likes their dialogue sharp and stinging, cutting straight to the bone!

Mojo is on at the Met Bar on the 21st and 22nd of July. Tickets available at here.

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