Saturday Night Fever

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Opening Night verdict ⭐️⭐️⭐️

Reviewed by Nikki Cotter

Based on the 1978 film starring John Travolta in THAT white 3 piece suit, Saturday Night Fever strutted into Manchester last night for a week’s stay at the city’s Palace Theatre.

Set in the backstreets of Brooklyn, Saturday Night Fever is a coming of age story combined with a jukebox musical of the Bee Gee’s greatest hits.

Tony Manero (Richard Winsor) lives for his Saturday nights at the local discotheque; the perfect escape from his dull job and not so harmonious home life with his abusive father and downtrodden mother. Dancing is the one thing that gives Tony purpose, credibility and a means of escape. When a dance competition is announced Tony must decide who to compete with, local girl Annette (Anna Campkin) or new girl on the scene Stephanie (Kate Parr).

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While there have been several touring versions of Saturday Night Fever this is the first I’ve seen where the Bee Gee’s classics such as Stayin’ Alive, You Should Be Dancing, Jive Talkin’ and More Than A Woman are delivered on stage by a tribute group. Taking on the formidable challenge of becoming the Gibbs brothers are Edward Handoll, Alastair Hill and Matt Faull. The trio are note perfect in their delivery of the iconic soundtrack & could easily fool you into thinking it’s a real Bee Gee’s recording being played.

Experienced actor and dancer Richard Winsor struts his way around the stage as the infamous Tony, confident and cool he also manages to portray the angsty sensitive side of the determined dancer with ease. His skills as a dancer highlighted beautifully during his emotional solo during Immortality.

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There is a huge amount of talent on stage; the strong ensemble cast deliver Bill Deamer’s high-energy choreography with at times jaw-dropping commitment. The music too is superb and the show certainly looks the part as Gary McCann’s industrial set of moving stairs and walkways add authenticity to the piece while the colourful 70’s costumes take us right back to the period. The show however feels at times like something is missing, while the production touches on some real issues including suicide and drugs they aren’t ever developed or explored in any real way, we never really get to know anyone well enough to emotionally connect or even really care much about their journey which seems like a missed opportunity which could have taken this show to the next level.

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That said Saturday Night fever knows its audience and delivers spectacular dance routines complete with multi-coloured dancefloor and spinning disco balls with perfection. If you’re looking for some seriously sizzling dance routines and stunning vocal arrangements then you won’t be disappointed.

Catch Saturday Night Fever at Manchester’s Palace Theatre until Saturday 26th January tickets available here.

 

 

 

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