East Is East

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Opening Night verdict ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️

Set in Salford in the 1970’s, East Is East is a powerfully sharp and deeply moving story of an Anglo-Pakistani family struggling to find their place not only in society but also within their own four walls.

Patriarch George (Kulvinder Ghir) rules his family with an iron fist, emotional torment and physical threats are his go to methods for gaining respect from his wife and his frustrated children who are desperate to make their own way in the confused world they’re struggling to make sense of.

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Mother Ella (Jane Hazlegrove) loves them fiercely and longs for her husband to love their children for who they are and allow them to explore the opportunities their Western lifestyle allows. The family is fractious and fraught as siblings squabble desperate for release from the pressure of their fathers imposed conformity.

Kulvinder Ghir is outstanding as George, warm and loveable one moment, seething with explosive anger the next. He takes George to breaking point with sensitivity and conviction. Ultimately a frightened man, lashing out at those he loves most due to his pride, his fears and his need for control.

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Jane Hazelgrove impresses as ballsy mum Ella, with a heart full of love for her children and a genuine loyalty towards husband George, her portrayal is believable and honest. The scenes between Ella and Auntie Annie (Claire Hackett) are playful and fun, putting the world to rights over a steaming hot brew being the order of the day.

Each of the children are well cast and deliver their differing roles convincingly, torn between love for their family and their desperation for their own identities they bicker and squabble yet love each other fiercely. This is an enormously talented ensemble cast each and every individual excels with special mention to Shila Iqbal as foul mouthed Meenah who shines as the sassy sole female of the siblings.

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Director Ben Occhipinti guides his cast beautifully ensuring Ayub Khan Din’s sharp script is delivered with maximum impact and perfect pace. The laughs which come thick and fast are perfectly interjected with dramatic action which stops you in your tracks, witty dialogue is interrupted by heart-breakingly poignant moments which silence and shock.

The production superbly explores themes of culture, identity, family and acceptance. It may be set in the 70’s but these themes still resonate strongly today. In our modern world with there’s often thinly veiled pretences at multiculturalism East Is East feels relevant, current and is an important story to tell. The laughs plentiful, are balanced beautifully with ‘hold your breath’ heart stopping moments of raw emotion in this slick and superbly delivered production. Sharp, honest and boldly brilliant.

On at the Octagon theatre until Saturday 14th April tickets available here.

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